PowerMyLearning School Check Up

Take this four-minute online quiz to get an honest view into how well your school implements best practices with students and families to advance equity and prevent learning gaps. In the age of distance learning, it is more important than ever for families to be brought in as supportive learning partners.

Take the 4-Minute Checkup!

Thinking about the learning environment that teachers create at your school, please answer the following questions:
Thinking about the instructional content that your teachers design and deliver, please answer the following questions:
Thinking about the way that teachers use data, please answer the following questions:
Thinking about the way that teachers support the development of student agency, please answer the following questions:

Please enter your name, organization and email to show your results. 

Here are your results!


These results reflect how your school's current practices might align to the PowerMyLearning Framework for Teachers, a research-based set of instructional practices that empowers teachers to advance educational equity and accelerate students’ social-emotional learning and academic achievement. The Framework provides a roadmap to a learning community where teachers, families, and students collaborate on the same learning goals—exponentially improving outcomes for students.

You are ready to take this work to the next level!

A strong learning environment should be established with and for students and their families. So, what does this look like?

Students succeed in an environment that nurtures inquiry and academic mindset, values independent and collaborative learning, and creates a safe space for students to comfortably engage in productive struggle. Additionally, teachers support perspective-taking and encourage students to practice empathy, exhibit kindness, respect differences, and celebrate diversity.

Teachers also invite students’ families to be partners in the learning community. They take time to get to know families and understand their values. Families feel welcome in the classroom and see their values reflected in classroom norms and expectations.


You are off to a good start!

A strong learning environment should be established with and for students and their families. So, what does this look like?

Students succeed in an environment that nurtures inquiry and academic mindset, values independent and collaborative learning, and creates a safe space for students to comfortably engage in productive struggle. Additionally, teachers support perspective-taking and encourage students to practice empathy, exhibit kindness, respect differences, and celebrate diversity.

Teachers also invite students’ families to be partners in the learning community. They take time to get to know families and understand their values. Families feel welcome in the classroom and see their values reflected in classroom norms and expectations.
There’s more to do in this area.

A strong learning environment should be established with and for students and their families. So, what does this look like?

Students succeed in an environment that nurtures inquiry and academic mindset, values independent and collaborative learning, and creates a safe space for students to comfortably engage in productive struggle. Additionally, teachers support perspective-taking and encourage students to practice empathy, exhibit kindness, respect differences, and celebrate diversity.

Teachers also invite students’ families to be partners in the learning community. They take time to get to know families and understand their values. Families feel welcome in the classroom and see their values reflected in classroom norms and expectations.

You are ready to take this work to the next level!

Planning and delivering effective instructional content is a cornerstone of a teacher’s role. When teachers engage students in learning experiences that are designed to be academically rigorous so that students do work at all levels of cognitive complexity, they develop deep understandings of key concepts while building critical thinking skills.

When a teacher plans learning content with attention to students’ cultural identities and prior experiences, it helps students understand the relevance of subject matter and make meaningful connections to the real world.

To that end, teachers seek to leverage family and community input and bring their voices and experiences into instructional content, making connections to local context, culture, and history. Teachers can also put systems in place to share learning standards and expectations with families.

You are off to a good start!

Planning and delivering effective instructional content is a cornerstone of a teacher’s role. When teachers engage students in learning experiences that are designed to be academically rigorous so that students do work at all levels of cognitive complexity, they develop deep understandings of key concepts while building critical thinking skills.

When a teacher plans learning content with attention to students’ cultural identities and prior experiences, it helps students understand the relevance of subject matter and make meaningful connections to the real world.

To that end, teachers seek to leverage family and community input and bring their voices and experiences into instructional content, making connections to local context, culture, and history. Teachers can also put systems in place to share learning standards and expectations with families.

There’s more to do in this area.

Planning and delivering effective instructional content is a cornerstone of a teacher’s role. When teachers engage students in learning experiences that are designed to be academically rigorous so that students do work at all levels of cognitive complexity, they develop deep understandings of key concepts while building critical thinking skills.

When a teacher plans learning content with attention to students’ cultural identities and prior experiences, it helps students understand the relevance of subject matter and make meaningful connections to the real world.

To that end, teachers seek to leverage family and community input and bring their voices and experiences into instructional content, making connections to local context, culture, and history. Teachers can also put systems in place to share learning standards and expectations with families.

You are ready to take this work to the next level!

Powerful data-driven instruction can shift classrooms. We see success when teachers use formative assessment data and anecdotal information to adjust their teaching to address the different students’ needs as they arise. This means reorganizing student groupings, providing differentiated materials to support students, or re-teaching material in a different way.


Teachers also share data back with students and families in a way that provides a foundation for them to understand their areas of strength, areas for growth, and progress over time.

Finally, teachers invite families to share information and expertise on their children’s learning, including how their children learn best.
You are off to a good start!

Powerful data-driven instruction can shift classrooms. We see success when teachers use formative assessment data and anecdotal information to adjust their teaching to address the different students’ needs as they arise. This means reorganizing student groupings, providing differentiated materials to support students, or re-teaching material in a different way.

Teachers also share data back with students and families in a way that provides a foundation for them to understand their areas of strength, areas for growth, and progress over time.

Finally, teachers invite families to share information and expertise on their children’s learning, including how their children learn best.
There’s more to do in this area.

Powerful data-driven instruction can shift classrooms. We see success when teachers use formative assessment data and anecdotal information to adjust their teaching to address the different students’ needs as they arise. This means reorganizing student groupings, providing differentiated materials to support students, or re-teaching material in a different way.

Teachers also share data back with students and families in a way that provides a foundation for them to understand their areas of strength, areas for growth, and progress over time.

Finally, teachers invite families to share information and expertise on their children’s learning, including how their children learn best.
You are ready to take this work to the next level!
Student agency and interpersonal skills, including social-emotional learning skills, are developed when teachers establish strong learning relationships with students and their families and a shared vision for academic, social and emotional growth and success.

With clear expectations for respectful academic discourse, students use discussion to process and apply new concepts and information, and developing their critical thinking skills. Through modeling the metacognitive process of setting goals, identifying learning strategies, and monitoring progress, students learn to reflect on and evaluate their own areas of strength and need, and set achievable goals for themselves that culminate in meeting learning standards.

The teacher also encourages families and students to talk regularly with each other about students’ goals and plans to achieve them, and shows families how to help students reflect on their learning strategies and progress in order to improve.
You are off to a good start!

Student agency and interpersonal skills, including social-emotional learning skills, are developed when teachers establish strong learning relationships with students and their families and a shared vision for academic, social and emotional growth and success. 

With clear expectations for respectful academic discourse, students use discussion to process and apply new concepts and information, and developing their critical thinking skills. Through modeling the metacognitive process of setting goals, identifying learning strategies, and monitoring progress, students learn to reflect on and evaluate their own areas of strength and need, and set achievable goals for themselves that culminate in meeting learning standards.

The teacher also encourages families and students to talk regularly with each other about students’ goals and plans to achieve them, and shows families how to help students reflect on their learning strategies and progress in order to improve.
There’s more to do in this area.

Student agency and interpersonal skills, including social-emotional learning skills, are developed when teachers establish strong learning relationships with students and their families and a shared vision for academic, social and emotional growth and success. 

With clear expectations for respectful academic discourse, students use discussion to process and apply new concepts and information, and developing their critical thinking skills. Through modeling the metacognitive process of setting goals, identifying learning strategies, and monitoring progress, students learn to reflect on and evaluate their own areas of strength and need, and set achievable goals for themselves that culminate in meeting learning standards.

The teacher also encourages families and students to talk regularly with each other about students’ goals and plans to achieve them, and shows families how to help students reflect on their learning strategies and progress in order to improve.